Arrest is a Minor Inconvenience

In the state of Alabama, over 700 people die each year because they lack the resources to afford medical care.  They fall into the gap between eligibility for Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act.  Venus Colley-Mims was one such person.  Unemployed in 2007, she didn’t have medical insurance and she discovered a lump in her breast.  She went to the Emergency Room, which is where many without medical insurance go to receive treatment.  It is often the only place that will see a patient who does not have insurance. There she was told don’t worry about it.  Six months later the lump had grown and had become painful.  She again went to the Emergency Room and was given medication for the pain. This went on for two years, when finally a doctor took one look at her breast and sent her to oncology.  She had stage four cancer. Treatment came too late for Ms Colley-Mims.  She died in 2013.

 

Venus Colley-Mims life could have been saved if she had access to health insurance.

Venus Colley-Mims life could have been saved if she had access to health insurance.

This past week, Save OurSelves: A Movement for Justice and Democracy held a Jericho March and rally at the capitol of Montgomery in solidarity with the Moral Monday Movement of events in five southern states.  The seven day event focused on a different area where justice has been thwarted by the current State Legislature and Governor Bentley. The areas covered were Immigration reform, Women’s Rights, Education and Youth, Prison reform, Voting rights, Medicaid Expansion, and Worker’s Rights/Living Wage.

Governor Bentley, a doctor by profession, has refused to expand Medicaid because he opposes President Obama. In a state where the unemployment rate has risen in sharp contrast to the national trend, Medicaid expansion would have brought in 30,000 living wage jobs into Alabama in addition to saving lives and heartbreaking grief. This callousness towards the welfare of the people of Alabama for the sake of political posturing is evil, plain and simple.

On Thursday in an attempt to get Governor Bentley’s attention to the plight of the citizens he is elected to serve, I joined six other attendees of the final Jericho March and entered the capitol, before closing to hold a 24 hour prayer vigil for the state.  Within ten minutes after closing, we were asked to leave.  We thanked them but stated we needed to remain and pray for the governor to change his heart on the matter of Medicaid expansion. He is killing people with his refusal.

Faya Touro (aka Rose Sanders) Leading us in song: "There's a River Flowin' in My Soul" in the Capitol Building of Montgomery.

Faya Toure (aka Rose Sanders) Leading us in song: “There’s a River Flowin’ in My Soul” in the Capitol Building of Montgomery.

The Secretary of the Governor eventually came down to speak with us and pleaded with us to leave the building.  We stated we would not leave unless Governor Bentley expanded Medicaid and saved people’s lives.

We were arrested.  And in what appears to be an act from the Governor’s office, instead of receiving a trespassing charge in the third degree ** which is unlawful presence and carries a small fine, we received a trespassing charge in the second degree which carried a $500 bond.  Court date is set for September 15.

When the stake is the potential of saving 700 lives annually by demanding Medicaid Expansion to cover the 300,000 people in the state who fall in between the current eligibility and the parameters of the Affordable Health Care Act, a little inconvenience of being arrested is nothing in comparison. I will choose to stand on the side of love, every time.

 

**Corrected from an earlier post.  Second Degree Trespassing is a Class C Misdemeanor which if sentenced in full is a $500 fine and/or up to 90 days in prison.  Third degree Trespassing is a violation and up to a $200 fine.

 

From left to right:  Alecha Irby, John Zippert, Faya Touro (aka Rose Sanders) Rev. Fred l Hammond, Annie Pearl Avery, Rev. Kenneth Sharpton-Glascow, Augustus Townes

From left to right: Alecha Irby, John Zippert, Faya Toure (aka Rose Sanders), Rev. Fred L Hammond, Annie Pearl Avery, Rev. Kenneth Sharpton-Glascow, Augustus Townes

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One Comment

  1. Fred, as always, we r proud of u! You r one if the very few people who we personally know will stand up against social injustices regardless of the personal coats. If there is ever any way that we can help u, please let us know. Love, Louise and Richard (should say costs Not coats; hate the “word” Checker in this cellphone”


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